Housing Policy Tools

HOUSING POLICIES

Inclusionary Zoning

“Inclusionary Zoning” is defined by the American Institute of Certified Planners to mean:

The mandatory inclusion of affordable or local housing units, or financial setaside, as a quid quo pro for development approval.

Jurisdictions utilizing this program often require that such units be of the same type or similar to other units being approved in the development. Thus, affordable housing in a wide variety of types and configurations may be produced with this program. For example, a development consisting of single-family lots might result in the setaside of a percentage of the single-family lots for affordable housing, although the lots need not be the same size or as well located as other lots in the development; and a multi-family development might setaside a percentage of the multi-family units being built, although the units need not be as large or as luxurious as other units in the development. In Colorado, inclusionary zoning may work most easily for ownership housing. (Regional Affordable Housing Initiative, 2000, page 51.)

Who uses it? Example Ordinances, Guidelines & IGAs
Jurisdiction  % affordable
Aspen 60%
Snowmass Village 45%
Pitkin County 60%
Basalt 20%
Carbondale 15%
Glenwood Springs 15%
Garfield County 10% [only for PUD’s asking to increase density]

Basalt

Carbondale

Glenwood Springs

Eagle County

Garfield County

Pitkin County & City of Aspen

Division of Housing Summaries of Inclusionary Zoning practices in Colorado Communities

Affordable Housing Ordinances:
Frequently Asked Questions 

Commercial Linkage

“Commercial/ Industrial/ Lodging Linkage” refers to zoning provisions that require new development to provide funds or housing to mitigate some portion of identifiable housing needs created by the new development.  The rationale for this program is that these uses are the direct source of most permanent and seasonal employees and should be required to “pay their own way.”  In these communities the housing that is produced is limited to multi-family housing suitable for low- and moderate- income households, including seasonal workers, singles, as well as young families.  (Regional Affordable Housing Initiative, 2000, page 53.)

Who uses it? Example Ordinances, Guidelines& IGAs
Jurisdiction  % affordable
Aspen 60%
Snowmass Village 45%
Pitkin County 60%
Basalt 20%

Impact Fees

Who uses them? Example Ordinances, Guidelines& IGAs
Jurisdiction  
Aspen
Snowmass Village
Pitkin County
Basalt
Summit County Construction Impact Fee
$.50-2.00/ sq.ft.

Dedicated Funding

Who uses it? Example Ordinances, Guidelines & IGAs
Jurisdiction  Funding Source
Aspen Real Estate Transfer Tax*
Snowmass Village Excise Tax
Pitkin County Residential Impact Fee
Basalt Commercial Impact Fee
Summit County .125% sales tax
City of Boulder .10 mill property tax and excise tax on all new development

*No longer allowable after the adoption of the TABOR amendment to the Colorado Constitution.

Other Policies & Resources

Colorado Division of Housing

PolicyLink

Center for Housing Policy

Center for Community Change (Housing Trust Funds)

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